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Homemade Diaper Rash Remedies That Really Work

Homemade Diaper Rash Remedies That Really Work

Diaper rashes are not only uncomfortable, but they can lead to a number of infections that can place a lot of stress on babies as well as their parents.  The most common cause of diaper rashes is wearing dirty diapers for long periods of time, and this can be a big problem during a prolonged survival situation as supplies may be limited and you try to conserve your stockpile.  Let’s take a look at some common, yet simple remedies that you can use to help clear up diaper rashes in order minimize the discomfort and stress that may be magnified during difficult times.

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Vinegar

Vinegar is a gentle, yet effective way to balance pH levels on the skin after it comes into contact with the acidic compounds in urine.  These acids irritate the skin and contribute to chafing, redness as well as the potential for bacterial and yeast infections to develop.  If you are using disposable diapers, clean them as normal before soaking them in a bucket that contains one cup of vinegar for every gallon of water.  Allow to dry without rinsing and this will help to protect the baby when they wear the diapers the next time.  Another important option is to add a tablespoon of vinegar to a cup of water and gently dab it on the baby’s skin after cleaning and before putting on the new diaper.

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Baking Soda and Cornstarch

Both of these items help to absorb moisture and reduce friction between the diaper and skin.  Using them can help to speed up the healing of rashes while also helping to prevent them from developing in the first place.  To treat a rash, take two tablespoons of baking soda for every cup of water and stir until the powder is dissolved.  Gently wash the rash and pat it dry.  You can also use a baking soda/water mixture to bathe the baby a few times a day until the rash clears. 

Sprinkling cornstarch on the baby’s bottom after removing the diaper and cleaning the area can help to reduce friction and contribute to the healing process as well.  Simply apply a generous amount of starch to the skin and new diaper before putting it on the baby.

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Coconut Oil and Shea Butter

Coconut oil is a fantastic skin moisturizer that is loaded with vitamins that also promote healing and the overall health of skin as well.  You can apply the oil to an existing rash or as a way to prevent one from occurring.  You can also add a few tablespoons of coconut oil to the bath water and use it to help cleanse and protect all of the skin. 

Shea butter acts as a moisturizer, but it also has very strong antibiotic and anti-fungal properties that can go a long way to quickly heal rashes while preventing new ones from developing.  Simply let the butter melt in your hands before applying it to the baby’s bottom and putting on a new diaper.  You can also use a small amount of petroleum jelly to act as a protective barrier between the diaper and the skin as an alternative. 

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Oatmeal and Breast Milk

Oatmeal baths are well-known for helping to alleviate the pain and irritation associated with various skin conditions.  Not only does it help to dry out rashes, but it soothes the skin and helps to promote the healing process.  Believe it or not, breast milk is also an excellent option to use for treating diaper rashes due to their nutrient content and the fact that the baby will not have an allergic reaction to the treatment.  Apply some milk to the affected area and allow it to dry before using one of the other remedies listed above to coat and protect the skin after you put on the new diaper.

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list, and there are many other home remedies out there that can be used to help prevent diaper rashes and to reduce their recurrence.  Try them for yourself, and feel free to share any other ideas or remedies that have worked for you or someone you know. 

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How to Ward off a Killer Bee Attack

How to Ward off a Killer Bee Attack


Two recent African or Killer Bee attacks occurred in Arizona that left one person dead while injuring more than a dozen and sending another to the emergency room.  African bees are a particularly dangerous species that are not native to the United States.  However, they have been steadily spreading from Latin America into the Southern United States, and they continue to move farther north every year.  Consequently, the threat they pose is placing more and more of the population at risk. 

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They Are Aggressive

Killer bees are by far more aggressive than most other species, and they attack in huge numbers.  This is the main reason that they are so deadly.  The attack that sent the Arizona hiker to his death left him with over a thousand stings.  It was estimated that a swarm of over 20,000 bees contributed to the other attack on worshipers in an Arizona mosque.  While it is unclear what spurred these attacks, the reality is that killer bees come out in force and strike with a vengeance.   

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Be Aware of Your Surroundings

Most bee attacks occur if they feel their territory or hive is threatened.  The best way to avoid problems is to avoid areas where hives exist or bees are present in groups.  Know your surroundings, know where hives may be located and avoid these areas at all costs.  Remember that bees like cracks and crevices, hollowed out trees or even things like flag poles that provide cover and shade along with an entry and exit point. 

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What to do if Attacked

The best thing to do when attacked is to run in a straight line as fast as you can.  Keep running until you find some form of shelter, such as your vehicle, building or outhouse.  If possible, try to seek shelter in a well-lit room or one with sunny windows.  The light will confuse the bees and most likely cause them to gravitate in that direction as opposed to attacking you.  If you get into a vehicle, don’t worry if some bees get inside.  Drive away and roll down the windows a couple of blocks from the scene of the attack.  There’s a good chance that the bees will exit the vehicle in an attempt to re-join the swarm.

You also want to protect your face and eyes as much as possible.  Killer bees aim for the face and will try to sting the eyes, mouth, nostrils and ears.  Somehow they know our weaknesses, and the fastest way to impair your ability to run is to strike the eyes.  Cover your face as much as possible, with just enough space in the fabric to see through.  Try to use a handkerchief or spare shirt so you don’t have to remove your shirt and leave your torso unprotected.  However, if worse comes to worse, getting stung in the torso is better than getting stung in your eyes.

You may also want to consider keeping an extra piece of fabric or even portable bee netting on hand for your protection.  You can put them in your pocket and take them out if necessary. 

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What Not to do if Attacked

DO NOT jump into water under any circumstances.  The bees will wait, and they will attack you as soon as you come up for air.  You also may end up getting tired and end up drowning long before the bees will call off the attack.  You also want to avoid panicking, dancing or jumping around or flailing your arms.  Bees are attracted to movement, and chances are that they will become more aggressive if you get excited. 

You also want to avoid trying to swat at the bees.  They will see this as a threat and become more defensive and take the attack to another level entirely.  Finally, avoid playing dead, otherwise you may end up getting killed during the attack.  While you can’t outrun bees, you can get to shelter and minimize the extent of the attack and amount of stings you receive.

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Follow Up

After the attack occurs, examine the body to see how many stings are present.  If there are more than 15 or so, or if you start to develop swelling in the neck, face or airway, have difficulty breathing or chest pains, seek immediate medical attention.  Watch others for symptoms as well.  While most bee stings are harmless to humans, with the exception of those who are allergic, the sheer number of stings from killer bee attacks can be fatal.

Remember that African bees are here to stay, and they are moving north.  This means that many communities will start to encounter them in large numbers for the first time.  Always have good situational awareness, avoid getting close to hives, be mindful of places to seek for shelter and act appropriately if attacked.  You should also avoid wearing dark or floral clothing and perfumes that have a sweet, floral or citrus scent. 

Following these simple steps can mean the difference between life and death if you or someone you are with is attacked. 

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